3D Printed Fabric 2017.6

Gabi Asfour has a cerebral, esoteric bent that soon becomes clear in his work. Since becoming curious about 3D printing around 2009, he has been trying to manipulate the internal geometry of textiles.
Traditional fabric is essentially two-dimensional — strands are arrayed horizontally, vertically, and in crisscross to form a weave. Asfour—who has degrees in mechanical engineering and architecture from the University of Maryland—had a vision, along with Donhauser and Gil, to create “three-dimensional interlocking weaves,” which they would achieve with the help of laser cutting. The desire to mess with fabric’s third dimension drew them naturally to 3D printing.
So far, Asfour says, “the most advanced fabric has been a four-way stretch.” That’s what’s possible with most normal fabric, which stretches along the X and Y planes. 3D printing would allow a material to stretch in the Z plane, Asfour theorized. He figured that such fabric would be more breathable and make movement easier. Best of all, it would eliminate wrinkles.

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タンパク質素材の実用化へ向けた第一歩

Stronger than steel and more flexible than nylon, spider silk is said to be the toughest material on earth. For the past 11 years a Japanese company has been attempting to harness that strength to create a new type of material with unprecedented versatility. They’ve now unveiled their working prototype: the Moon Parka.

 現在スポーツアパレルの多くは、石油を原料として製造された合成高分子材料(ポリエステルやナイロンなど)を使用していますが、これらの材料はその製造工程で膨大なエネルギーを消費しており、膨大な温室効果ガスを排出しています。石油の枯渇が懸念されている状況において、枯渇資源に代わる持続可能な資源へ転換していくことは、現代社会に生きる私たちにとっての大きな責任です。

PR Times

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