8 Lean Wastes in an Apparel Factory Context

Lean Wastes in an Apparel Factories Context

For Upper Tier Factories  (well managed apparel factories, with demonstrably well managed production and quality systems) the typical most frequently encountered wastes are: Non-Used Talent, Motion, and Over Processing. 

These 3 wastes are common at well managed factories for 3 reasons (1) defects and other "lower level wastes" have been somewhat addressed by the factory already, (2) the common mistake of  thinking held by many upper tier factories' managers that over processing is needed to ensure quality. These managers still fail to affect factory-floor systems that train and empower the lowest levels of management, possibly due to high employee turnover or other reasons, and (3) eliminating excess operator motion during the sewing process is probably the most difficult of the wastes to eliminate since it involves a total re-training of worker posture, materials-handling layout, and operator sewing related habits modification. 

For Lower Tier Factories  (less well managed apparel factories, with less well managed production and quality systems) the typical most frequently encountered wastes are:  defects, transport, and waiting. 

These 3 wastes are common at less well managed factories for 3 reasons (1) the factory is still not able to decrease defects. This can occur when the factory has high operator turnover, and/or line management personnel (Line Leaders, Line Tech) who systematically do not use that data to improve the line to reduce defects,  (2) there is no system to control bundles input into the line, and to propel those bundles forward one-at-a-time, reducing WIP builtup, and (3) line change over process is still presenting to these lower tier factories severe challenges of long, drawn out change overs, which force  the line to virtually stop for several hours or even days at some factories.

The good news is that all the wastes can be reduced through proper training and management, and profitability through increased productivity can easily be achieved if the process to do it is well led by an experienced person.

Compete Less On Price

In a world where the customer is able to set the price, to grow your business you need to compete less on Price, and more on Material Control, and Function/Design.

Here is how to do it.

  1. Take a real hard, clear look at your company’s current capability level. Are you competing mostly on price right now?
  2. Decide how to take your operation to the next level.
  3. Understand that getting to the next level involves changes in mindset, planning, and strategy execution, rather than heavy financial investment.
  4. To compete on a higher level, you probably will need to get outside guidance for a limited amount of time.
  5. Competing profitably on any of these levels, including Price, involves 2 factors:  (1) how well you develop your employee’s talent, and (2) how well you execute your strategy across all of your company’s teams to achieve target performance

PDF

Garment Manufacturing Technology

Garment Manufacturing Technology, 1st Edition

Editor(s) :Nayak   &   Padhye   

Release Date:28 May 2015

Imprint:Woodhead Publishing

Garment Manufacturing Technology, 1st Editio

  • 1. Introduction: the apparel industry
    • 1.1. Introduction
    • 1.2. Global scenario of apparel manufacturing
    • 1.3. Challenges in apparel production
    • 1.4. Role of various organisations
    • 1.5. Future trends
    • 1.6. Conclusions
  • Part One. Product development, production planning and selection of materials
    • 2. Product development in the apparel industry
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Product-development models and product-development process
      • 2.3. Variations in apparel product development: demand-led product development
      • 2.4. Apparel product-development technologies
      • 2.5. Apparel product standards, specifications, quality assurance and product technical package
      • 2.6. Apparel product life-cycle management (PLM) and supply-chain relationships
      • 2.7. Measures for apparel product development
      • 2.8. Future trends in apparel product development
      • 2.9. Case studies: PD tools and technologies
      • 2.10. Conclusions
      • 2.11. Sources of further information and advice
    • 3. Role of fabric properties in the clothing-manufacturing process
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Fabric properties and performance
      • 3.3. Garment make-up process and fabric properties
      • 3.4. Low-stress mechanical properties and make-up process
      • 3.5. Control system
      • 3.6. Fabric tailorability, buckling and formability
      • 3.7. Sewability
      • 3.8. Conclusions
    • 4. Production planning in the apparel industry
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Production planning
      • 4.3. Production systems
      • 4.4. Production planning and control in the apparel industry
      • 4.5. Supply chain management in the apparel industry
      • 4.6. Inventory management
      • 4.7. Manufacturing performance improvement through lean production
      • 4.8. Waste management
      • 4.9. Human resource management
      • 4.10. New tools developed in production planning
    • 5. Fabric sourcing and selection
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Fabric sourcing
      • 5.3. Fabric inspection
      • 5.4. Future trends
      • 5.5. Conclusions
    • 6. Selecting garment accessories, trims, and closures
      • 6.1. Part 1: introduction to garment accessories
      • 6.2. Part 2: selecting garment accessories
      • 6.3. Part 3: selecting supporting materials
      • 6.4. Part 4: selecting closures
      • 6.5. Part 5: accessories for children's wear
      • 6.6. Part 6: evaluation of quality of trims and accessories
      • 6.7. Part 7: fashion accessories
      • 6.8. Conclusions
  • Part Two. Garment design and production
    • 7. Garment sizing and fit
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Geometry of the human form
      • 7.3. The human figure divided into body proportions
      • 7.4. Garment size charts
      • 7.5. Development of garment size charts
      • 7.6. Sizing and fit systems
      • 7.7. Three-dimensional (3D) body scanning – current and potential future applications in clothing manufacture and retailing
      • 7.8. Conclusions
      • 7.9. Sources of further information
    • 8. Pattern construction
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Pattern construction modes
      • 8.3. Body, material and design
      • 8.4. Pattern construction tools
      • 8.5. Conclusions
      • 8.6. 2D and 3D CAD Web sites
    • 9. Fabric spreading and cutting
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Cut process planning
      • 9.3. Spreading of textile materials
      • 9.4. Cutting of textile materials
      • 9.5. Fusing of cut textile components
      • 9.6. Final work operations of the cutting process
      • 9.7. Future trends
      • 9.8. Conclusions
    • 10. Sewing, stitches and seams
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Stitch classes
      • 10.3. Seam types
      • 10.4. Seam-neatening
      • 10.5. Future trends
      • 10.6. Conclusions
      • 10.7. Sources of further information and advice
    • 11. Sewing equipment and work aids
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Different bed types in industrial sewing machines
      • 11.3. Different feed types in industrial sewing machines
      • 11.4. Cyclic sewing machines
      • 11.5. Computerised sewing machines
      • 11.6. Work aids
      • 11.7. Sewing automats
      • 11.8. Sewing needles
      • 11.9. Sewing threads
      • 11.10. Future trends and conclusions
      • 11.11. Sources of further information and advice
    • 12. Sewing-room problems and solutions
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Seam pucker and other surface distortions
      • 12.3. Sewing defects caused by needles
      • 12.4. Material feeding and associated problems
      • 12.5. Problems in stitch formation
      • 12.6. Thread breakage
      • 12.7. Future trends
      • 12.8. Conclusions
      • 12.9. Sources of further information and advice
    • 13. Alternative fabric-joining technologies
      • 13.1. Alternatives to sewing
      • 13.2. Adhesive bonding
      • 13.3. Conventional thermal welding
      • 13.4. Advanced thermal-welding processes
      • 13.5. Conclusions
    • 14. Seamless garments
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Seamless technique
      • 14.3. Common seamless products
      • 14.4. Raw materials
      • 14.5. Seamless knitting machines
      • 14.6. Advantages of seamless garments
      • 14.7. Disadvantages of seamless garments
      • 14.8. Applications of seamless garments
      • 14.9. Future developments
      • 14.10. Conclusions
  • Part Three. Garment finishing, quality control, care labelling and costing
    • 15. Garment-finishing techniques
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Garment finishing for functionality
      • 15.3. Knitwear finishing
      • 15.4. Denim garment finishing
      • 15.5. Pressing (factors and equipment)
      • 15.6. Future trends
      • 15.7. Conclusions
    • 16. Quality control and quality assurance in the apparel industry
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Quality control in the apparel industry
      • 16.3. Future trends
      • 16.4. Conclusions
      • 16.5. Sources of further information and advice
    • 17. Care labelling of clothing
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Requirements of care labelling
      • 17.3. Definition of care label
      • 17.4. Care labelling systems
      • 17.5. Future trends
      • 17.6. Conclusions
    • 18. Garment costing
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Costing need
      • 18.3. Cost classification
      • 18.4. Cost elements
      • 18.5. Measures of efficiency
      • 18.6. Profitability
      • 18.7. Garment sales element analysis
      • 18.8. Mark-downs
      • 18.9. Managing cost through inventory control
      • 18.10. Apparel costing sheet analysis
      • 18.11. Conclusions
  • Index

New Type Multimedia Production Monitoring Board Concept

AMC and Mr. Pen Channara developed this Multimedia Production Monitoring Board Concept for a factory in Cambodia. 

Concepts we were working out:

  • in real time QC verified garments status
  • number of good garments vs number of garments targeted for that line (in real time)
  • on-demand videos to show how to do certain complicated or difficult processes to show the correct way to do. this info available at each line for line leader to train line better
  • board designed to be big enough for workers at the very start of the line to see easily the status of the line
  • ability for the workers to see how many more garments need to be made in order for the line to be at bonus target